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Lean Manufacturing Articles

WHICH DO YOU PREFER?

 

If you had your choice, which type of motivation would you prefer to be the driving force in your workplace? Which type of motivation would you prefer supply the "spark" for lighting the fire within? Which type of in­centive, an extrinsic reward or an intrinsic reward, is more likely to produce sustained effort over a long pe­riod of rime?

 

When I ask this question of management groups, the answer comes quickly, almost without hesitation, and in a single enthusiastic chorus. Intrinsic! Managers pre­fer that people at work are intrinsically motivated. That is, they want people to find their work interesting and challenging, fun to perform, and such that both a sense of accomplishment and pride prevails.

SUMMARY

 

      Effort. Technically, motivation is an internal state. I
can't see, touch, or feel "motivation," I can only see
the behavioral consequences of motivation. There­
fore, I can only conclude that someone is motivated
if I see goal-directed effort.

      Sustained effort. Sometimes motivation is tempo­
rary. Unfortunately, in order to accomplish anything
of consequence in life, we must have the passion to
stick to it over a period of time. Thus, the best way
to define real motivation is sustained, goal-directed
effort.

      Choices. In order to achieve sustained effort over a
period of time, we must make a commitment, priori­
tize our activities, and also sometimes make sacri­
fices in our lives. The lack of this kind of commitment
prevents many people from realizing their dreams in
life.

      Two types of motivation. There are two sources of
energy, or motivation: extrinsic and intrinsic. Extrin­
sic is powerful, but comes from without. Intrinsic is
longer lasting, and comes from within. In the work­
place we must strive to create an environment of in­
trinsic motivation.

To Be Continued

For balance of this article, click on the below link:

Lean Manufacturing Articles and click on Series 14


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