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The first characteristic has to do with energy (where you get energy from, and where you prefer to expend energy). If you are an E - Extravert, you draw your en­ergy from and give your energy to the outer world of people and things. If you are an I - Introvert, you draw your energy from and give your energy to the inner world of concepts, thoughts and ideas. The difference behaviorally is that Introverts tend to think very deeply about things and not say very much about them, while Extra-verts tend to say a lot about things as a part of the think­ing process. They extravert their thinking. ThusIntroverts can be perceived as being shy, standoffish, deep thinkers, and serious, while Extraverts can be per­ceived as being outgoing, friendly, chatterers, and frivo­lous. In behavior, Introverts prefer activities that allow them to concentrate, while Extraverts prefer activities that put them in contact with others.

The second characteristic has to do with data gath­ering (how you collect and process information). If you are an S - Sensing, you gather data through your five senses, and like and trust immediate, real, and practical facts. If you are an N - Intuitive, you gather data through your five senses, and then identify possibilities, relation­ships and meaning. The difference is that Sensors orga­nize information and then use it as separate pieces of data, while Intuitives allow information to float freely, and use it in all kinds of combinations. The difference behaviorally is that Sensors are very focused on reality, things as they are, and can be perceived as being seri­ous, rigid, and structured. Intuitives are focused on pos­sibility, things as they could be, and can be perceived as being trivial, flexible, and unrealistic.

The third characteristic has to do with decision mak­ing (what basis you use for making decisions). If you are a T - Thinking, you make your decisions objectively, on the basis of logic, reason, and rational thought. If you are an F - Feeling, you make your decisions subjec­tively, personally, on the basis of values and human re­lationships. The difference is that Thinking judgers, while they have strong feelings, don't use their feelings as an aid to decision making, and don't consider the people consequences of their decisions. They can be per­ceived as being unfeeling and impersonal. Feeling judg­ers, on the other hand, consider the people consequences of their decisions as most important, and may not con­sider the logical consequences. They can be perceived as being emotional and illogical.

The last characteristic has to do with which of your functions (data gathering or decision making) you show the outside world by your behavior. If you are a J - Judg­ing, you show die outside world your preference for mak­ing decisions, for things to be decided and settled. If you are a P - Perceiving, you show the outside world your preference for collecting information, keeping your op­tions open. The difference is that Judging types prefer lives and activities that are organized, where things are clearly planned in advance, and where they can control what is going to occur. They can be perceived as being overly controlling, rigid, and inflexible. Perceiving types prefer lives and activities that allow room for spontane­ity, where things are allowed to be flexible, and where they can respond to what occurs. They can be perceived as being procrastinators, indecisive, and scatterbrained.

To Be Continued

For balance of this article, click on the below link:

Lean Manufacturing Articles and click on Series 13


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